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Sat,23Sep2017

Publications and Reports

Publications and Reports

Being an active research NGO, AFCRN has numbers of publications published by its members and/or jointly with other research institutes.

 

PUBLICATIONS

  1. Adewole I, Martin DN, Williams MJ, Adebamowo C, Bhatia K, Berling C, Casper C, Elshamy K, Elzawawy A, Lawlor RT, Legood R, Mbulaiteye SM, Odedina FT, Olopade OI, Olopade CO, Parkin DM, Rebbeck TR, Ross H, Santini LA, Torode J, Trimble EL, Wild CP, Young AM, Kerr DJ. Building capacity for sustainable research programmes for cancer in Africa. Nat Rev Clin Oncol. 2014 May;11(5):251-9. doi: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2014.37. Epub 2014 Mar 11. Review. PubMed PMID: 24614139; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4403794.
  2. Cheng ML, Zhang L, Borok M, Chokunonga E, Dzamamala C, Korir A, Wabinga HR, Hiatt RA, Parkin DM, Van Loon K. The incidence of oesophageal cancer in Eastern Africa: identification of a new geographic hot spot? Cancer Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;39(2):143-9. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2015.01.001. Epub 2015 Feb 3. PubMed PMID: 25662402; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4470609.
  3. Chokunonga E, Borok MZ, Chirenje ZM, Nyakabau AM, Parkin DM. Trends in the incidence of cancer in the black population of Harare, Zimbabwe 1991-2010. Int J Cancer. 2013 Aug 1;133(3):721-9.

Editorial: Childhood Cancer in sub-Saharan Africa

Measurement of incidence rates of childhood cancer in Africa is difficult. The study ‘Cancer of Childhood in sub Saharan Africa’ [Stefan C, Bray F, Ferlay J, Parkin DM and Liu B (2017) Cancer of Childhood in sub-Saharan Africa ecancer11(755)] brings together results from 16 population-based registries which, as members of the African Cancer Registry Network (AFCRN), have been evaluated as achieving adequate coverage of their target population. The cancers are classified according to the third revision of the International Classification of Childhood Cancer (ICCC-3) and recorded rates in Africa are compared with those in childhood populations in the UK, France, and the USA.

It is clear that, in many centres, lack of adequate diagnostic and treatment facilities, leads to under-diagnosis (and enumeration) of leukaemias and brain cancers. However, for several childhood cancers, incidence rates in Africa are higher than those in high income countries. This applies to infection-related cancers such as Kaposi sarcoma, Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and also to two common embryonal cancers—retinoblastoma and nephroblastoma. These (and other) observations are unlikely to be artefact, and are of considerable interest when considering possible aetiological factors, including ethnic differences in risk (and hence genetic/familial antecedents).

The data reported are the most extensive so far available on the incidence of cancer in sub Saharan Africa, and clearly indicate the need for more resources to be devoted to cancer registration, especially in the childhood age range, as part of an overall programme to improve the availability of diagnosis and treatment of this group of cancers, many of which have—potentially—an excellent prognosis.

You may read the full Editorial here. Or download the Editorial in PDF below.


Questionnaire 2014 - Use of Cancer Data

During the 2nd Annual Review Meeting of AFCRN which took place in Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, 21st -23rd January 2014, it was agreed to conduct a survey to determine some basic characteristics of member registries, to enquire into the nature of any links between registries and their respective Heath Authorities (national and/or local), and to review whether data from individual registries had been used in national or local cancer control planning.

A questionnaire was developed (available for download ) to collect data about the registries. It covered five areas:

  • background,
  • funding situation,
  • data collection methods,
  • registry output and
  • use of data in cancer control.